National Indigenous Cancer Network (NICaN) » Yarning board


LIVE DISCUSSION FORUM: PALLIATIVE CARE

  • 24 October

    Genuinely, sensibility is basic on the planet and the tranquility on the planet depends upon value and I think, preparing is amazingly significant for academic writing service peace in our world. Without peace we can't value the life and we should give law preparing to the children to care for value.

  • Member
    19 March 2015

    Yes you would think that HP diversity would help rather than hinder but I think its about making the time to discuss and share learning, and perhaps being willing to acknowledge a lack of knowledge of a particular culture. In otherwords a desire to learn through engaging in conversations.


     


    Cultural brokerage and peer support through the cancer process make sense as a strategy that would work in helping bring understandings to more of a shared place.


     


     Thanks so much Catherine. Your honesty and commitment to ensuring better care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people really shines through.

  • 19 March 2015

    I would have presumed that the more diversity of people in a workplace would mean that it would be able to address any issue.  In my idealistic world that would mean workplace members would share pertinent information (over time) and everyone's world would grow alittle bigger. 


     


    But the comment a clinician made to you, says that while there is a diverse workplace, they dont talk about it.  Kinda like that article you identified from the APOCC stuff. Choose not to recognise on the presumtion its too much who har, when actually thats the stuff that binds people.


     


    People need safe services, someone needs to know and understand (maybe patient, maybe another person-everyones different), key people need to share the journey,allowing family to know what could possibly happen next (so theres not shock or blame), key family will then share with other family.


     


    People need honesty, its scary to take this journey alone, we (the experienced in this area) need to walk beside & support allowing others to see and know that its ok, this is part of our lifes journey, and while it may be the end to this life, it brings a beginning. 


     


    Cultural brokers are needed for family and services staff, they are great value. Recognise the importance of mens and womens business and have male and female staff.  Palliative care is holistic care, that all i've wanted my whole life, and as we come to the end of our lives, its finally available, if others choose to allow that to happen.


     


    I talk to much, my apologies.  I would love to hear from anyone in this area.  Qik FYI. PEPA recently distributed a document nationally "Cultural Considerations providing end of life care for Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people".  Feedback has been very good and interest is amazing.  Some say they will be using this as a training tool.

  • Member
    19 March 2015

    I agree Catherine. Empowerment is key.

  • Member
    19 March 2015

    Hi Catherine


     


    Yes we can get caught up in all of that stuff. Again, you highlight critical issues here. It's not about just simply doing a course on culture. But its about having that 'willingness' to learn and engage and to be compassionate.

  • 19 March 2015

    I consistently see articles where all interactions come down to communication, one thinks they do it well, the other has no idea whats going on. 



    Guessing thats all down to peoples cultural norms to.  Wouldn't it be great if everyone was taught to empower others. 

  • Member
    19 March 2015

    Here's the link to the article.   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23297651


     


    I'll post the Abstract to the article also but will do in a separate post in case the formatting causes problems.

  • 19 March 2015

    please, we could talk about all of those words and be here for days.


     


    I have worked with many people in the past, that didnt know but were open to learning, every family is different, and everyone needs to be open to ongoing learning. 


     


    I'm thinking many are like me, while I'm nearing half a century - there's still plenty of lessons in store for me.  I'm surprised when others think they can learn all about our culture in a few hours or days.  People dont need to know the all the finer details but they do have be sensitive to the different ways of different people and know how to speak in a down to earth and honest way to people.  Sometime identifying to client that there is things that you might not know, but respectfully you will be checking with them to ensure their concerns, beliefs, needs and choices are being addressed.

  • Member
    19 March 2015

    Catherine


     


    You raise some very critical points here. I like the analogy of using 'rules as weapons'. This is so common in all aspects of life. Yes the systems should be flexible to accommodate different needs and preferences of patients.


     


    Your comments about being unsure what to say is also something I've heard before. This is I think why many health professionals don't engage to extent that they could. I think it has to do with not wanting to say the wrong thing, or just not having the skills to navigate within an another culture. There was a paper published about a year ago that talks about everyone wanting to be treated the same or everyone being treated differently, according to their cultural needs and preferences. Health professionals were interviewed. I'll just try to find the article.


     


    The other day in another session, a clinician made the comment that the workforce is so diverse and then so is the patient group. So this adds additional complexities.

  • 19 March 2015

    Barriers:  People, change, addressing the ingrained stuff, the unknown, using rules as weapons instead of being understanding and flexible according to individuals and families needs.  Miscommunication, lack of trust....and it goes on


     


    Some people tell me they have never had much contact with Aboriginal people, so they are unsure of what to do or say, as they dont want to be offensive (mistakenly).  Thats when you chime


    in and say, wouldnt you treat everyone like you would like to be treated.