HeartInfoNetwork » Yarning board


HealthInfoNet Cardiovascular health (HeartInfoNet) update

  • 2 December 2015
  • 17 September 2015

    Hello to all of our mob members!

    Here's your HealthInfoNet CVD update for 17 September 2015. 


     


    Regards,

    Miranda Poynton
    Research Officer 
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

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    News

    Remote Indigenous children at higher risk of heart problems

    New framework for nurse practitioners specialising in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Publications, resources and reports

    Adverse outcome after incident stroke hospitalization for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

    Rheumatic heart disease in Indigenous children in northern Australia: differences in prevalence and the challenges of screening

    Overcoming the tyranny of distance: an analysis of outreach visits to optimise secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in high-risk individuals living in Central Australia

    Measuring BMI in an Aboriginal population survey: who are the non-responders?

    Chronic conditions manual: prevention & management of chronic conditions in Australia

    Deadly Choices health promotion initiative evaluation report: January - December 31, 2013

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Jobs

    Aboriginal Chronic Care Coordinator, Northern Sydney Local Health District, NSW
    Closes 17 September 2015

    Aboriginal Health Worker (Chronic Disease), Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service, Kempsey, NSW
    Closes 18 September 2015

    Spotlight on a health promotion resource:

    Blood pressure resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
    Health professionals are invited to order free Indigenous hypertension resources from NPS MedicineWise. The resources include a flipchart for educational sessions, a patient brochure on high blood pressure and flyers on the following medicines: ACE inhibitors; angiotensin receptor blockers; beta blockers; calcium channel blockers; and thiazide diuretics. The resources were produced by Heart Foundation of Australia, NPS MedicineWise, National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation and Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.poynton@ecu.edu.au

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 26 August 2015

    Hello to all of our mob members!

    Here's an update on your CVD web resource on the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

    Please forward this email to any of your colleagues who might be interested. Subscription requests should be made to m.poynton@ecu.edu.au

    *Apologies for any cross posting*

    Kind regards,

    Miranda Poynton
    Research Officer
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

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    News

    New report sets benchmarks to measure cardiac care and outcomes for Indigenous people

    Department of Health inviting feedback on discussion paper addressing care of patients with chronic and complex conditions

    New health initiative to reduce chronic disease in Aboriginal community in Hunter New England health region, NSW

    Innovative men's heart failure yarning session in Perth

    Publications, resources and reports

    Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: first national report 2015

    Atrial fibrillation in the Indigenous populations of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States: a systematic scoping review

    A cohort study: temporal trends in prevalence of antecedents, comorbidities and mortality in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians with first heart failure hospitalization, 2000-2009

    Low birthweight increases risk for cardiovascular disease hospitalisations in a remote Indigenous Australian community – a prospective cohort study

    Disparity in mortality from rheumatic heart disease in Indigenous Australians

    A framework for a nurse practitioner role in acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Increased numbers and clustering of acute rheumatic fever in an Aboriginal community: spike in endemic disease or true outbreak?

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Jobs

    Preventable Chronic Conditions Educator (Nhulunbuy), Department of Health, NT
    Closes 30 Aug 2015

    Echocardiographer, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, SA
    Closes 31 Aug 2015

    Aboriginal Health Education Officer (Female), NSW Health - Hunter New England Local Health District, NSW
    Closes 4 Sept 2015

    Aboriginal Health Worker (Chronic Disease), Durri Aboriginal Corporation Medical Service, NSW
    Closes 18 Sept 2015

    Spotlight on a project

    Healthy, black and deadly
    Healthy, black and deadly is a new chronic disease initiative of the New South Wales Government being implemented by the Hunter New England Local Health District. It includes five component fitness programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the region: Shake a leg; I-fit program; Making tracks; Let’s talk tucker; and the Chronic disease healthy lifestyle program. The five programs will be delivered by trained health and fitness professionals.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.poynton@ecu.edu.au

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 29 July 2015

    Hey mob members!

    Here's your last CVD round up for July.

    We hope you enjoy it.

    Best wishes,

    Miranda Poynton
    Research Officer
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 

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    News

    Point of care testing for renal failure and chest pain in remote NT
    Flinders University researchers are planning to run a study in six remote health centres in the Northern Territory to determine the patient benefits and cost savings of using point-of-care testing (POCT) devices.

    Kowanyama residents learn about healthy lifestyles to avoid chronic disease
    Residents of the remote community of Kowanyama, in the Cape York region of Queensland, were recently provided with an education session to learn about the importance of healthy lifestyles for avoiding chronic diseases.

    Campaign to raise funds for Jimmy Little Foundation
    Graham 'Buzz' Bidstrup, Chief Executive of the Jimmy Little Foundation, has launched a new fundraising campaign. The Jimmy Little Foundation did not receive funding under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, and is likely to close without some financial assistance.

    Publications, resources and reports

    RHD bicillin video (2015)
    RHDAustralia and Queensland Health have collaborated to produce this new 26-minute online video for clinicians who administer intramuscular (IM) Bicillin LA injections to prevent acute rheumatic fever. The video provides an overview of the different injection sites for Bicillin LA, as well as techniques and strategies that may help minimise the pain, stress and inconvenience for people with a history of acute rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease.

    A cross-sectional survey and latent class analysis of the prevalence and clustering of health risk factors among people attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (2015)
    This study aimed to describe the clustering of key health risk factors, such as smoking, physical inactivity and alcohol consumption, and socio-demographics associated with clusters, among a predominantly Aboriginal group of people in regional/rural New South Wales, Australia. The results were: Cluster 1 (‘low fruit/vegetable intake, lower risk’; 51 %) consisted of older men and women; Cluster 2 (‘risk taking’; 22 %) included younger unemployed males with a high prevalence of smoking, risky alcohol, and illicit drug use; Cluster 3 (‘inactive, overweight, depressed’; 28 %) was characterised by younger to mid aged women likely to have experienced emotional or physical violence.

    Indigenous population dot map of Australia
    This new online tool is an interactive map of every Indigenous Australian person counted by the 2011 ABS Census. The map has 699,900 dots - one for each person. Users can zoom in to incredibly detailed levels. The map was an entry in a recent competition to innovate with open Government data.

    Presentations from the 13th National Rural Health Conference in Darwin in May are now online, including:
    Improving Aboriginal heart health in Western Australia: bringing everyone on the journey (2015)
    Outcomes following cardiac arrest in remote areas of the Northern Territory (2015)
    Streamlining chronic disease management in the Torres Strait: review of current practice and recommendations for improvement (2015)

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Pilbara heart health forum: Karratha, WA, 28-29 August 2015

    Baker IDI educational symposium: challenges in managing heart and diabetes in primary health care: Alice Springs, NT, 29-30 October 2015

    Spotlight on a project

    Bundap marram durn-durn
    The Bundap marram durn-durn project, which was initiated by members of Melbourne's Wurundjeri community, aimed to support Aboriginal people in Melbourne who have a chronic disease and who were also experiencing anxiety or depression. The publication of some findings from this project were highlighted in our last HealthInfoNet CVD Round-up.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.poynton@ecu.edu.au

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 8 July 2015

    Hey mob members!

    Here's your first CVD round up for July.

    We hope you enjoy it.

    Best wishes,

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 



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    News

    New bid to tackle rheumatic heart disease rates
    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has joined acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in becoming a notifiable condition in Western Australia, in a bid to reduce its impact on remote Indigenous communities. As of mid-June, health professionals are required by law to report all cases of RHD. The move is designed to strengthen the prevention, diagnosis and management of ARF and RHD-related conditions which, in Australia, are almost exclusive to Indigenous people living in remote parts of the nation’s central and northern regions.

    RHDAustralia travels to Barunga to paint the story of rheumatic fever
    RHDAustralia travelled to Barunga Festival for the second successive year to teach children and their parents about the causes of rheumatic fever, and some easy preventative strategies to help avoid Group A streptococcus, the germ that causes ARF and RHD. RHDAustralia focused their stall around primary prevention of rheumatic fever through activities to teach visitors about the germs that cause rheumatic fever, and provide them with some basic education around hand and face washing.

    Job vacancies

    Principal Program Officer (Outreach Health Services) (NT)
    The Health Network Northern Territory is seeking suitable applicants to fill the role of Principal Program Officer. This position will work with other team members to plan, manage and coordinate outreach health services, oversighting the implementation of approved service plans and the delivery of multidisciplinary comprehensive primary health care to meet the needs of people living in rural and remote NT. Proven experience and skills relevant to chronic diseases, Indigenous health and comprehensive primary care are required.

    Indigenous Outreach Worker (WA)
    The South West Aboriginal Medical Service has a vacancy for an Indigenous Outreach Worker to join their team. The successful applicant will assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members to access health care and follow up services, and provide outreach to people diagnosed with a chronic illness.

    Research Assistant (NSW)
    The George Institute for Global health is seeking suitable applicants for the role of Research Assistant. This position involves working on two projects designed to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health; one is the development and evaluation of a mobile health management platform for screening, prevention, early detection and management of chronic disease; and the other is the development and evaluation of a mobile health application to assist in smoking cessation.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Bundap Marram Durn Durn: engagement with Aboriginal women experiencing comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions (2015)
    This study aimed to explore antecedents of health service engagement and health service experience among urban Aboriginal people with comorbid chronic physical conditions and issues of social and emotional wellbeing. The study recruited 19 people, all of whom were women, who were asked questions about their personal histories and prior experience of health services. The research found that service experiences were characterised by long waiting times and high healthcare staff turnover, with results indicating the need to explore strategies to improve health care utilisation by urban Aboriginal women.

    Hypertension: high prevalence and a positive association with obesity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in far north Queensland (2015)
    The objective of this study was to fill an important evidence gap by describing the prevalence of hypertension and other chronic disease risk among remote-living Indigenous youth. As well as describing the prevalence of hypertension, pre-hypertension was explored. The study found that pre-hypertension, hypertension and other cardiovascular risk in this population is highly prevalent, with hypertension particularly prevalent among male participants. The results reiterate the importance of early life experience in cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Facilitators and barriers to implementation of a pragmatic clinical trial in Aboriginal health services (2015)
    This qualitative study aimed to identify facilitators and barriers to trial implementation in the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) and government health service from the perspective of providers and trial participants. The study forms part of a broader trial process evaluation. The study found that despite strong community and health service support, major investments in time and resources are needed to ensure successful implementation and minimal disruption to already overstretched, routine services. Funding agencies need to consider these additional resource demands when supporting trials of a similar nature.

    Environmental health challenges in remote Aboriginal Australia communities: clean air, clean water and safe housing (2015)
    This literature review aimed to investigate information on the unique environmental challenges that remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities face, to improve understandings of environmental risk factors in remote Indigenous communities. The review found that the environmental factors focused on, water, overcrowding and air pollution, are anecdotally high in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and have been linked to cardiovascular, respiratory and other infectious diseases.

    Sticking to treatment (2015)
    Sticking to treatment is a 5-minute music video that promotes the importance of sticking to a treatment regime for rheumatic heart disease. The video was developed by West Australian performance artist Nelson Baker, Goolarri Media, and the Western Australia Country Health Service. The video aims to reach out to patients, their friends, family and community, and demonstrate the seriousness of adhering to a decade-long treatment regime of monthly penicillin shots to prevent recurrences of rheumatic fever.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Pilbara heart health forum: Karratha, Western Australia, 4-5 September 2015
    Local and national heart health experts will deliver this multidisciplinary forum on primary and secondary prevention, with a focus on Aboriginal people. Along with plenary sessions, the forum will also feature four multidisciplinary streams featuring: clinical updates; provision of resources; case study learning; opportunities for collaborative problem-solving and service coordination for doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and Aboriginal Health Workers. Delegates will have the opportunity to network and connect with colleagues, specialists and other delegates who share an interest in cardiac care.

    Australian Disease Management Association 11th national conference: Brisbane, Queensland, 10-11th September 2015
    The 11th annual national Australian Disease Management Association (ADMA) conference will be focusing on partnerships in chronic care. Conference themes include: population health including Indigenous health; person-centred care; telehealth and telemedicine; models of integrated care; and health and social integration.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Chronic disease research translation lecture: Darwin, Northern Territory, 22 October 2015
    This public lecture series, hosted by Menzies School of Research to celebrate their 30th anniversary, will focus on the topic of chronic disease. It will be presented in the form of a panel discussion in order to allow delegates the opportunity to ask guest speakers questions. Dr Anna Ralph will be presenting on the topic of rheumatic heart disease.

    Funding opportunity


    CSANZ Indigenous researcher/scientist scholarship
    This scholarship is awarded by the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) to enable scholars to undertake a clinical research project directed towards improving the cardiovascular health of Indigenous populations of Australia and/or New Zealand. The scholarship is open to residents of Australia and New Zealand who are of Indigenous background, and are a health worker, post graduate scholar, or post-doctoral scientist working in the field of Indigenous cardiovascular health. Expressions of interest close 15 July.

    Spotlight on a project

    Getting every child’s heart ok (gECHO) study
    This project was a population based survey to document the extent of undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The aim of the initiative was to determine the prevalence of RHD among Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous children. It also aimed to determine the most sensitive and specific screening method for RHD and use this information to guide future screening programs. The results of gECKO have helped to develop a more accurate criteria for diagnosis of RHD on echo and ensure that only people who really have RHD will be treated for it.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 17 June 2015

    Hi mob members,

    Here's the latest CVD round up!

    Happy reading,

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

    **************************************************************************

    News

    AHCWA welcome release of report into Aboriginal health programs
    Western Australia’s (WA) peak Aboriginal health organisation has welcomed the release of a review into the performance of WA’s State-Funded Aboriginal health programs, but says it still has some questions the State government needs to answer. The review, undertaken by UWA Emeritus Professor, D’Arcy Holman, found that of the Aboriginal health projects it evaluated, 91% delivered ‘good’, ‘excellent’ or ‘outstanding’ value for money. The review includes some recommendations about the funding and structure of Indigenous chronic disease programs in WA, including those that address CVD and its risk factors.

    Queensland researchers on the verge of Streptococcus A disease vaccine
    Queensland researchers believe immunisation against streptococcal disease is within reach, after a 30-month trial of their experimental combination therapy proved successful on mice. Streptococcal disease kills half a million people worldwide every year, and disproportionately affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

    Job vacancies

    Healthy Skin Clinician (NT)
    One Disease has a vacancy for a Healthy Skin Clinician to join their team. This position will be given responsibility for two to three Indigenous communities in the NT, where the successful applicant will develop and implement a scabies elimination program in partnership with the local residents. Scabies can develop into crusted scabies if not treated, which has been linked to particular types of heart and kidney disease.

    Registered Nurse/Allied Health Professional (Chronic Disease) (NT)
    Miwatj Health is seeking suitable applicants to fill the role of Registered Nurse/Allied Health Professional (Chronic Disease). This position will provide support to the Chronic disease outreach program, and assist in the development, implementation and evaluation of culturally appropriate Aboriginal health projects.

    Health Coach (NSW)
    Healthways Australia has a vacancy for an experienced Aboriginal identified Health Coach to join their team in North Ryde. This position will work on Healthway’s Telehealth program, which is designed to help individuals stay healthy, prevent diseases associated with lifestyle factors and promote best possible health for those who are already affected by a chronic condition.

    Preventable Chronic Disease Coordinator (WA)
    Ngaanyatjarra Health Service (NHS) is seeking suitable applicants for the position of Preventable Chronic Disease Coordinator. This position will provide support, leadership and coordination of the NHS Preventable chronic disease program across the Ngaanyatjarra Lands, utilising a nationally recognised Preventable chronic disease strategy as the foundation.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Managing two worlds together: stage 3: improving Aboriginal patient journeys – study report (2015)
    This study report summarises the activities, findings and challenges of the Improving Aboriginal patient journeys (IAPJ) study. The aim of the IAPJ study was to develop, refine, and evaluate a set of Aboriginal patient journey mapping tools for use in quality improvement and education. A collaborative approach to knowledge exchange was used, with the research team working with staff and managers from a range of health settings in South Australia and the Northern Territory. Cardiac patients journeys are an important focus of this report.

    Chronic diseases in Australia: blueprint for preventive action: discussion and policy paper (2015)
    This paper, the second report produced by the Mitchell Institute on this issue, identifies strategic priorities for taking action to prevent chronic diseases. This report moves beyond the evidence provided in the previous report to provide a framework for action. The vision of this Blueprint is to reduce the impact and incidence of chronic diseases through preventive interventions. The desired outcomes, against which progress should be measured, comprise: healthy lives; healthy children; healthy communities; and healthy economies.

    A promising future: WA Aboriginal health programs: review of performance with recommendations for consolidation and advance (2014)
    This external review of WA’s state-funded Aboriginal health programs was released to the public this month. It includes some recommendations about the funding and structure of Indigenous chronic disease programs in WA, including those that address CVD and its risk factors.

    Maternal deaths in Australia 2008-2012 (2015)
    Cardiovascular conditions, psychosocial conditions and sepsis were the leading causes of maternal death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women 2008-2012 (Table 5.3). In contrast, the most common specific causes of maternal death for other Australian women in this period were hypertensive disorders and non-obstetric haemorrhage, followed by cardiovascular conditions.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health performance framework 2014 report (2015)
    This is the fifth report against the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework, released by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council. The report finds that there was a significant decline in the mortality rate for Indigenous Australians (16%) and a significant narrowing of the gap with non-Indigenous Australians (15%) between 1998 and 2013. Circulatory disease mortality rates for Indigenous Australians declined by 40% between 1998 and 2012 and the gap narrowed. Circulatory disease was the most common cause of death for Indigenous Australians (25%) during 2008–12.

    Making the case for a more accurate cardiovascular disease risk assessment tool for Indigenous Australians (2015)
    This article argues that there is currently not an accurate CVD risk assessment tool tailored to meet the needs of Indigenous Australians, and notes that a tool designed for Indigenous Australians, that takes into account cultural and historical factors, environmental and socioeconomic factors, psychosocial stressors and limited access to both preventive and clinical health care, may improve the quality and accessibility of cardiovascular services for Indigenous populations.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Pilbara heart health forum: Karratha, Western Australia, 4-5 September 2015
    Local and national heart health experts will deliver this multidisciplinary forum on primary and secondary prevention, with a focus on Aboriginal people. Along with plenary sessions, the forum will also feature four multidisciplinary streams featuring: clinical updates; provision of resources; case study learning; opportunities for collaborative problem-solving and service coordination for doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and Aboriginal Health Workers. Delegates will have the opportunity to network and connect with colleagues, specialists and other delegates who share an interest in cardiac care.

    Australian Disease Management Association 11th national conference: Brisbane, Queensland, 10-11th September 2015
    The 11th annual national Australian Disease Management Association (ADMA) conference will be focusing on partnerships in chronic care. Conference themes include: population health including Indigenous health; person-centred care; telehealth and telemedicine; models of integrated care; and health and social integration.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Chronic disease research translation public lecture: Darwin, Northern Territory, 22 October 2015
    Menzies School of Health Research has launched a public lecture series as part of their 30th anniversary celebrations. This free lecture on chronic disease will take the form of a panel discussion. Speakers include: Dr Anna Ralph (rheumatic heart disease), Associate Professor Louise Maple-Brown (diabetes in pregnancy), Associate Professor John Condon (Indigenous cancer), and Professor Alan Cass (kidney health).

    Funding opportunity

    CSANZ Indigenous researcher/scientist scholarship – expressions of interest
    This scholarship is awarded by the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) to enable scholars to undertake a clinical research project directed towards improving the cardiovascular health of Indigenous populations of Australia and/or New Zealand. The scholarship is open to residents of Australia and New Zealand who are of Indigenous background, and are a health worker, post graduate scholar or post-doctoral scientist working in the field of Indigenous cardiovascular health. Expressions of interest must be received by 15 July 2015.

    Spotlight on a project

    Centre of research excellence in Aboriginal chronic disease knowledge translation and exchange (CREATE)
    CREATE is a collaboration between a number of organisations that aims to: use existing evidence and, where necessary, develop and collate new evidence to inform guidelines, policies and/or other tools focused on improving care and outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with, or at risk of developing a chronic disease; and to strengthen the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health service providers and researchers to conduct and use ‘evidence’ to improve health outcomes. CREATE encourages the Aboriginal health sector to be involved where possible in the initiative, to take part in defining best practice for the sector, and also in shaping government policy.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

    ************************************************************************** 

  • 29 May 2015

    Hi mob members,

    Here's the latest CVD round up!

    Happy reading.

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

    **************************************************************************

    News

    Pilbara Aboriginal community gives go ahead to new heart health program
    The Heart Foundation WA and Chevron Australia have announced the development of an Aboriginal heart health program in the Pilbara region of Western Australia (WA), after resounding support from the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their families and the broader community. At an event held earlier this month, local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their families, communities and local organisations were invited to celebrate the results of a 10 month consultation process to develop the Pilbara Aboriginal heart health program.

    Thumbs up for trial allowing older Indigenous patients to monitor health with technology
    A pilot project using computer tablets to help elderly Indigenous people keep track of their health has been hailed a success. Under the Commonwealth funded trial, 111 Indigenous patients over the age of 50 were given tablets and smartphones to help monitor their chronic disease symptoms at home. The 18-month trial was conducted in four locations in New South Wales and Queensland, including Toowoomba in the state’s south.

    Eurobodalla boot camp initiative kickstarting healthy lifestyles
    Local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents of Eurobodalla, in New South Wales, have been taking part in a boot camp twice a week at Hanging Rock, as part of the George Rose knockout health challenge, a state wide competition offering $20,000 to the team which lost the most weight.

    Aurukun kids get healthier start to school life
    Apunipima Cape York Health Council carried out 127 health screenings for students at the Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy in community. At school screenings, children receive an eyesight and hearing screen, their height and weight is measured, their teeth are checked to make sure there is no decay or gum disease, iron and sugar levels are checked, along with their heart, limbs and skin. Apunipima Maternal and Child Health Worker, Johanna Hunt, who co ordinated the health checks, said children in Cape York receive school screening as a vital method of detecting early signs of chronic disease and developmental issues, which allows early prevention methods to be put in place.

    Job vacancies

    Aboriginal Health Worker (WA)
    WA Health has a vacancy for an Aboriginal Health Worker to join their team based in Albany/Katanning. This position will provide primary health care for Aboriginal clients, assisting with the development of self-care and responsibility for health. The position will also assist with the identification of Aboriginal health needs and the development of programs.

    Research Officer: Public Health (SA)
    The School of Population Health at the University of South Australia is seeking suitable applicants for the role of Research Officer: Public Health. This position will be responsible for providing administrative support for two key research projects – an Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute funded Centre of Research Excellence in Primary Care: prevention of chronic conditions in rural and remote high risk populations, and a National Health and Medical Research Council program grant: improving chronic disease for Indigenous Australians.

    Chronic Disease and Eyes Coordinator (NT)

    Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation have a vacancy for a Chronic Disease and Eyes Coordinator. This position will add specific capacity around eye care to the team that provides primary health care to the Sunrise region. The role will also involve traveling regularly to remote sunrise health centres to monitor monthly data regarding chronic disease across all communities.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Chronic illness care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: final report (2015)
    This report presents the findings from each phase of the Engaging stakeholders in identifying priority evidence-practice gaps and strategies for improvement in primary health care (ESP) project. The findings in this report are presented together for all participating health centres from all jurisdictions. It collates analysis of aggregated continuous quality improvement (CQI) data and stakeholder views on priority evidence-practice gaps, barriers and enablers to addressing the priority evidence-practice gaps, and strategies for improvement.

    Enablers and barriers to the implementation of primary health care interventions for Indigenous people with chronic diseases: a systematic review (2015)
    The objective of this systematic review was to gain a more comprehensive, evidence-based understanding of factors that support and inhibit the implementation of interventions aimed at the improvement of chronic disease care for Indigenous people within a primary health care setting. This systematic review aimed to identify and synthesise relevant international evidence on the factors that support or inhibit the implementation of interventions aimed at improving chronic disease care with the primary health care setting.

    An evaluation of the development, implementation, feasibility and impact of a tailored intervention to improve the quality of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people attending urban general practice (2015)
    This thesis aimed to develop and evaluate a tailor-made practice facilitation model to improve the acceptability of health care provided to Aboriginal peoples who attend urban mainstream general practice. The research found that the intervention used was acceptable, feasible and demonstrated some effectiveness as a quality improvement tool in general practice.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Pilbara heart health forum: Karratha, Western Australia, 4-5 September 2015
    Local and national heart health experts will deliver this multidisciplinary forum on primary and secondary prevention, with a focus on Aboriginal people. Along with plenary sessions, the forum will also feature four multidisciplinary streams featuring: clinical updates; provision of resources; case study learning; opportunities for collaborative problem-solving and service coordination for doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and Aboriginal Health Workers. Delegates will have the opportunity to network and connect with colleagues, specialists and other delegates who share an interest in cardiac care.

    Australian Disease Management Association 11th national conference: Brisbane, Queensland, 10-11th September 2015
    The 11th annual national Australian Disease Management Association (ADMA) conference will be focusing on partnerships in chronic care. Conference themes include: population health including Indigenous health; person-centred care; telehealth and telemedicine; models of integrated care; and health and social integration.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Spotlight on a project

    Home based outreach chronic disease management exploratory study (HOMES)
    This study explores new approaches to address chronic disease management in home-based outreach settings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. The HOME study’s objective is to determine if a home-based, patient-centred outreach model of chronic disease management (CDM) is acceptable, feasible, and appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic disease, their families, and their primary health care providers. The study is a collaboration between the Kanyini Vascular Collaboration, Baker IDI, Australian National University and The George Institute for Global Health.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 14 May 2015

    Hi mob members,

    Here's your latest CVD round up - apologies for the delay on this one!

    Happy reading,

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

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    News

    Budget 2015-16: information of relevance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
    Federal Treasurer, Joe Hockey, delivered his second Australian Government Budget on Tuesday evening, 12 May 2015. This page provides links to information on the budget and its implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

    Apunipima Cape York Health Council promotes healthy lifestyles for Heart Week
    ‘Spend less time on your seat and more time on your feet’ was the message underpinning Apunipima Cape York Health Council’s healthy lifestyle reminders to communities for Heart week. Apunipima Health Promotions Officer, Priscilla Gibson, said engaging in physical activity was important to reduce the risk of chronic disease, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. ‘Making healthy choices about food and exercise is important when it comes to the bigger picture on life expectancy in Cape York communities,’ she said.

    Job vacancies

    Chronic Disease Coordinator (WA)
    South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is seeking suitable applicants to fill the role of Chronic Disease Coordinator. This position will facilitate the development and coordinate the implementation of care plans that will assist clients of SWAMS to identify priorities and manage their chronic disease.

    Registered Nurse (Chronic Care) (NSW)
    Orange Aboriginal Medical Service has a vacancy for a Registered Nurse (Chronic Care) to join their team. This position will contribute to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic health conditions through better access to coordinated and multidisciplinary care.

    Exercise Physiologist (Qld)
    The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health has a vacancy for an Exercise Physiologist to join their team. This position will provide tailored programs for individuals, as well as groups in the Work it out program. Work it out is a chronic disease rehabilitation and self-management program which aims to improve activity levels, nutrition, and social and emotional wellbeing.

    Aboriginal Health Practitioner/Remote Area Nurse (Chronic Disease) (NT)
    Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation is seeking suitable applicants for the role of Aboriginal Health Practitioner/Remote Area Nurse. This position will provide additional capacity to the remote health teams to deliver comprehensive, multi-disciplinary care to the people of the region.

    Chronic Disease and Eyes Coordinator (NT)

    Sunrise Health Service Aboriginal Corporation have a vacancy for a Chronic Disease and Eyes Coordinator. This position will add specific capacity around eye care to the team that provides primary health care to the Sunrise region. The role will also involve traveling regularly to remote sunrise health centres to monitor monthly data regarding chronic disease across all communities.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Overview of Australian Indigenous health status, 2014 (2015)
    The Overview of Australian Indigenous health status 2014 provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It contains information about: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations; the context of Indigenous health; various measures of population health status; selected health conditions; and health risk and protective factors.

    A ‘Wellbeing Framework’ or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with chronic disease (2015)
    This report presents a wellbeing framework designed to assist healthcare services to improve the quality of life and quality of care, as well as the health outcomes, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with chronic disease. Guided by a national reference group, the framework incorporates physical and social, emotional, cultural and spiritual aspects of health and wellbeing.

    Heart story (2015)
    This resource package was designed to educate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about protecting their hearts from too much potassium in their diet while undergoing renal dialysis treatment. The resources are presented in English, Gapayugni and Walpuri languages. These resources were created by Nightcliff Renal Unit, in consultation with staff and patients of the unit.

    Patients’ and providers’ perspectives of a polypill strategy to improve cardiovascular prevention in Australian primary health care: a qualitative study set within a pragmatic randomised, controlled trial (2015)
    This study explores health provider and patient attitudes toward the use of a cardiovascular polypill as a health service strategy to improve cardiovascular prevention. The study found that the polypill was generally acceptable to patients and providers in cardiovascular prevention. Limitations to provider acceptability of this particular polypill were revealed, and a perception it might be more suitable for high-risk primary prevention patients, though future combinations could facilitate its use in secondary prevention. Participants suggested a polypill-based strategy as particularly appropriate for lowering the high cardiovascular burden in Indigenous populations.

    Complex needs and limited resources: influences on the provision of primary healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with chronic disease (2014)
    This monograph is the first of a series of five which aim to explore the issues that influence the ways in which primary healthcare services provide care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with chronic disease. This monograph focuses on an analysis and interpretation of the data emanating from these and other relevant system-level perspectives.

    The fork in the road: exploring factors which influence whether Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with chronic disease remain engaged with health services (2014)
    This monograph is the second of a series of five which aim to explore aspects of care and well-being for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with chronic disease. This monograph focuses specifically on features of patient/provider/system interactions that influence the nature and longevity of engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with chronic disease care.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Pilbara heart health forum: Karratha, Western Australia, 4-5 September 2015
    Local and national heart health experts will deliver this multidisciplinary forum on primary and secondary prevention, with a focus on Aboriginal people. Along with plenary sessions, the forum will also feature four multidisciplinary streams featuring: clinical updates; provision of resources; case study learning; opportunities for collaborative problem-solving and service coordination for doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and Aboriginal Health Workers. Delegates will have the opportunity to network and connect with colleagues, specialists and other delegates who share an interest in cardiac care.

    Australian Disease Management Association 11th national conference: Brisbane, Queensland, 10-11th September 2015
    The 11th annual national Australian Disease Management Association (ADMA) conference will be focusing on partnerships in chronic care. Conference themes include: population health including Indigenous health; person-centred care; telehealth and telemedicine; models of integrated care; and health and social integration.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Spotlight on an organisation

    Centre of Excellence for Indigenous Primary Care Intervention Research in Chronic Disease
    The mission of the Centre of Excellence for Indigenous Primary Care Intervention Research in Chronic Disease is to achieve health system reform to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic disease. Key objectives of the organisation include: improve the quality of care, quality of life and outcomes of chronic disease; and to develop a cadre of Indigenous primary care researchers with the skills and support to contribute to their communities needs in chronic disease into the future. Research activities being undertaken by the Centre include: developing a model of chronic disease care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; and extending research on the interplay between psychosocial factors such as chronic stress and depression on the burden and management of chronic disease in Aboriginal communities in order to develop future interventions in comorbid chronic disease.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other organisations doing great work for Aboriginal communities. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your organisation on site! Get in touch with me at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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  • 17 April 2015

    Hi mob members,

    Here's the latest round up.

    Enjoy!

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

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    News

    Heart week 2015
    Heart week 2015 will take place this year from Sunday 3 May to Saturday 9 May. The week is an opportunity to shine a spotlight on heart health issues in Australia. This year’s focus is on physical inactivity and the importance of active travel. Physical inactivity is a significant health issue and contributor to the burden of chronic disease in Australia – two in three (66.9%) Australians aged 15 and over are sedentary or engage in low levels of exercise.

    Report released: Australian burden of disease study: fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010
    The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare have recently released their second report in the Australian burden of disease study series. This report provides estimates of the fatal burden of disease for 2010 for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, as well as estimates the gap in fatal burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Around 3,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people die each year, resulting in almost 100,000 years of life lost due to premature death.

    CQUniversity researchers host workshops to address Indigenous chronic disease
    CQUniversity researchers have held a series of workshops and interviews as part of a project exploring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge, experiences and perceptions of chronic disease conditions in the greater Rockhampton region, Queensland. The project aims to contribute new information to the current literature, as well as assist a broad range of other stakeholders to address the levels of chronic disease that lead to the gap in health status and life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    Job vacancies

    Chronic Health Nurse (WA)
    QNA Healthcare Services has an opportunity for a Chronic Health Nurse to work for a remote health centre in WA, delivering primary care to the wider community. This role will see the successful applicant providing care coordination and self-management support for people diagnosed with chronic or complex conditions, and will work toward the improvement of Aboriginal health in the region.

    Chronic Disease Nurse (Qld)
    H1 Healthcare is seeking suitable applicants to fill the role of Chronic Disease Nurse. This position will provide triage services, undertake full health assessments, treatments and case management to a range of clients including children and Elders. Extensive knowledge in chronic disease is required, as well as an understanding of Aboriginal culture.

    Remote Area Nurses & Nurse Midwives (SA)
    Nganampa Health Council has opportunities for clinic-based Registered Nurses and Registered midwives to join their teams. These roles will be responsible for delivering primary health care according to the CARPA standard treatment manual, and assisting in the early detection and management of chronic illness.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Australian burden of disease study: fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010 (2015)
    This report presents estimates of fatal burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians for 2010, produced as part of the Indigenous component of the Australian burden of disease study. Fatal burden is measured in years of life lost, which is the sum of years of life lost due to premature death from disease and injury. Fatal burden estimates presented in this report are described for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population for broad disease groups, by age and sex. Estimates of the ‘gap’ in fatal burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are also reported, together with selected sub-national estimates.

    Early repolarization patterns associated with increased arrhythmic risk are common in young non-Caucasian Australian males and not influenced by athletic status (2015)
    This study aimed to assess the prevalence and effect of athletic activity on early repolarization (ER) patterns in young non-Caucasian and Caucasian subjects. The study found that ER patterns associated with increased arrhythmic risk are more common in young non-Caucasian people than Caucasian subjects and not influenced by athletic status. The long term clinical significance of ER in these populations is yet to be determined.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Childhood strep and staph infections workshop: Alice Springs, Northern Territory, 22 April 2015
    This free workshop for all interested health professionals aims to enhance participants’ understanding and management of childhood Streptococcus and Staphylococcus infections. The presenter for the workshop is Dr Andrew Tandy, a Consultant Paediatrician at Alice Springs Hospital. Attendance is free however RSVP is essential.

    Heart week 2015: Nationwide, 3-9 May 2015
    Heart week is an opportunity to shine a spotlight on heart health issues in Australia. This year’s focus is on physical inactivity and the importance of active travel. Physical inactivity is a significant health issue and contributor to the burden of chronic disease in Australia – two in three (66.9%) Australians aged 15 and over are sedentary or engage in low levels of exercise. There are a number of events planned across the country, including free heart health checks for residents of Ballarat. Check out the Heart Foundation page for more information, and for free Heart week resources.

    Think ARF, stop RHD workshop: University of Sydney, New South Wales, 11-12 May 2015
    RHD Australia is hosting a professional development workshop for NSW health workers and other health professionals involved in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Co-hosted by the Poche Centre at the University of Sydney, the workshop will be followed by a RHD colloquium on May 13 which will be held to develop a framework to enable a coordinated approach to ARF and RHD throughout Australia.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Awards

    NT Chronic Diseases Network recognition awards
    NT Chronic Diseases Network recognition awards have been held annually since 2008, and provide an opportunity to recognise and celebrate innovation, leadership and achievements made by those working in the field of chronic conditions across the NT. There are four award categories: chronic disease health promotion/program delivery award; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and leadership award; outstanding contribution to the prevention and management of chronic conditions in the NT; continuous quality improvement award. Winners will be announced at the Chronic Diseases Network Conference. Nominations close 15 May 2015.

    Spotlight on a project

    Analysis of mortality trends for rheumatic heart disease and rheumatic fever in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
    This project aimed to analyse the mortality trends of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and rheumatic fever in Australia between 1977 and 2005. The project, coordinated by RHDAustralia, examined national cause of death and population data, and RHD death data including specific information on: the number of deaths from RHD; age specific and age adjusted death rates; and for the Northern Territory only, regression analysis of time trends over a 29 year period.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

    **************************************************************************

  • 1 April 2015

    Hi mob members,

    Here's your first CVD round up for April.

    Happy reading!

    Millie Harford-Mills
    Research Assistant
    Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

    **************************************************************************

    News

    Heart Foundation warns access to healthy, fresh food is a major barrier to health
    The National Heart Foundation Cultural Lead, Vicki Wade, has welcomed the ABS nutrition data released recently, but warned that access to healthy, fresh food is a major barrier to health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and noted that nutrition related diseases are very high in this population, which contribute directly to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

    Rheumatic fever vaccine within reach
    A trans-Tasman working group investigating vaccine options for rheumatic fever, a major health issue in Australia and New Zealand, says a preventative medication is closer than it’s ever been. ‘This is the most confident I’ve felt yet that a vaccine is now within reach,’ said Professor John Fraser, a world leading infectious diseases specialist. ‘We have the capacity, we have the will of the international community and we have the funding of two governments to see this through.’

    Job vacancies

    Clinical Nurse Specialist (NT)
    The NT Department of Health is seeking suitable applicants for the role of Clinical Nurse Specialist. This position will provide leadership and clinical expertise in medical, cardiac and chronic disease nursing, to ensure provision of culturally safe, comprehensive and cost effective patient care.

    Remote Area Nurses & Nurse Midwives (SA)
    Nganampa Health Council has opportunities for clinic-based Registered Nurses and Registered midwives to join their teams. These roles will be responsible for delivering primary health care according to the CARPA standard treatment manual, and assisting in the early detection and management of chronic illness.

    Publications, resources and reports

    Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease – Australian facts: risk factors (2015)
    This report is a series of five reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Disease at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report on risk factors presents the latest statistics on behaviours and characteristics that increase the likelihood of a person developing these chronic diseases. It also describes risk factors among people who already have CVD, diabetes or CKD.

    Low birth weight and large adult waist circumference increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in remote Indigenous Australians – an 18 year cohort study (2015)
    This study examines an association of cardiovascular disease with early life risk factors, and explores the theory that birth weight and adult body size may interact to increase the risk of chronic disease.

    ESSENCE: Essential service standards for equitable national cardiovascular carE for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (2015)
    These standards represent the best available evidence and expert consensus on the essential services and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cardiovascular disease. The standards articulate what elements of care are necessary to reduce disparity in access outcomes for five cardiovascular conditions: coronary heart disease; chronic heart failure; stroke; rheumatic heart disease; and hypertension. The standards place a focus on the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease extending across the continuum of care, including primary prevention, risk identification and management in primary care, the management of disease in specialist, acute care and post-acute care settings.

    Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: nutrition results – food and nutrients, 2012-13 (2015)
    This report provides detailed, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific, nutritional information on food, beverages and dietary supplements, as well as some general information on dietary behaviours. The report is the first to collect detailed nutrition information from over 4000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

    To find other recent publications about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health check out the HealthBulletin – our peer reviewed electronic journal.

    Conferences and events

    Think ARF, stop RHD workshop: University of Sydney, New South Wales, 11-12 May 2015

    RHD Australia is hosting a professional development workshop for NSW health workers and other health professionals involved in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Co-hosted by the Poche Centre at the University of Sydney, the workshop will be followed by a RHD colloquium on May 13 which will be held to develop a framework to enable a coordinated approach to ARF and RHD throughout Australia.

    19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference: Darwin, Northern Territory, 24-25 September 2015
    The 19th Annual Chronic Diseases Network conference aims to examine the complex interplay between chronic conditions and life course events which influence chronic conditions. The theme for 2015 is Connecting the care – across the lifespan. There is a particular focus of the conference theme in the context of the Northern Territory. Aboriginal Health Workers, workers in remote locations, and anyone with a strong interest and focus on Aboriginal health are strongly encouraged to attend and be involved in the conference proceedings.

    Awards

    NT Chronic Diseases Network recognition awards
    NT Chronic Diseases Network recognition awards have been held annually since 2008, and provide an opportunity to recognise and celebrate innovation, leadership and achievements made by those working in the field of chronic conditions across the NT. There are four award categories: chronic disease health promotion/program delivery award; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and leadership award; outstanding contribution to the prevention and management of chronic conditions in the NT; continuous quality improvement award. Winners will be announced at the Chronic Diseases Network Conference. Nominations close 15 May 2015.

    Spotlight on a project

    Coalition to advance new vaccines against group A streptococcus (CANVAS) project
    This project aims to tackle rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and a range of serious infections caused by the bacterium group A streptococcus (GAS). The project is a trans-Tasman partnership - a collaboration between the Telethon Kids Institute in WA, the University of Auckland (New Zealand) and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (Vic) – to fast track development of a vaccine and assess the most cost-effective treatments. The Australian component of the project is leading the economic analysis of whether a vaccine approach is feasible.

    The CVD team at the HealthInfoNet is always interested to hear about other programs and projects that people are working on, or even ones that have already been completed. If you’d like to send us through some information we’d be more than happy to host your program on site! Get in touch with us at: m.harford-mills@ecu.edu.au.

    Tweets
    Click here to read the Tweets on our CVD Twitter page!

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